Post Your Entry!
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 02, 2018
The brilliant ad-heads at Dove and Ogilvy & Mather are at it again with the launch of their latest campaign “Waking Up Hannah” , a choose your own adventure-type comedy featuring a twenty-something female protagonist who bears an eerie resemblance to a young (and equally grating) Rachel Ray. According to Dove brand building manager Barbra Owens, “Girls in their 20s are often dealing with a lot of pressure...It’s really about helping wake up and get a fresh perspective on what’s going on”. As one of their target twenty-somethings, this immediately piqued my narcissistic interests. Excited that they might want to join my pity party, I decided to pay Hannah a visit. Choose your own adventure books were my fave, and I do like smelling pretty when I get out of the shower. I hit play. Hey, that looks like my last Saturday night out. Everyone likes a party girl. Except she has an iphone and I don’t; point one against Hannah, but only because I’m jealous. Hannah’s day seems to be determined by the scent her viewer selects for her shower; a bit of a stretch if you ask me, but I plod along. Alas, that was only the beginning and soon I find my brain stretched like the Laffy Taffy I’m gnawing on for lunch (they do fail to highlight the poor eating habits of the twenty-something). Perhaps the breaking point comes when she tells off her boss in order to attend her blind date. I fear I’m too mature for Hannah, which sends me into a bit of a self-reflective panic spiral that I’m not enjoying my life enough for Dove to tell me to “wake up and get a fresh perspective”. I shut that panic spiral up by a swig from the flask of girly flavoured vodka I keep in my all-nighter stash at work, right next to my Dove deodorant. As a lead-in to the ad launch, the undeniable success of the previous Ogilvy & Mather “real beauty” efforts have helped create buzz for this campaign. The real test however will be Dove’s ability to re-connect with its target demographic, a group otherwise objectified by Axe, their sister company. The significance of this controversy has not been tested on a new campaign, and the results will be interesting. Waking Up Hannah is well intentioned, but after all, it’s just a soap opera.
alishahnovin

alishahnovin

I started watching that movie thing... it's an interesting concept for a website/ad campaign - though, the entire time I found myself wondering what the male-equivalent of a campaign like this would be. The only thing I could think of was something more action-movie oriented, where the hero keeps cool with his Right Guard.

The peculiar part, especially, was the older sister who comes off as someone who's given up her dreams, and settled down - you're almost meant to laugh at her - she's worried about shriveled ovaries, and living a stable life, having a husband is important to her, etc. While most Dove commercials seem to attempt to "empower women" I found it odd how the older sister was portrayed - almost as an insult to any woman in that position.
REPLIES: Kate

Hogan

Hogan

Good deconstruction of an ad campaign. The only noble response to an ad, I think, is to praise its aesthetics, or ridicule its content.
REPLIES: alishahnovin

alishahnovin

alishahnovin

Replying to Hogan:
But it is not noble to ridicule the aesthetics, or praise it's content...?

Lilian

Lilian

This reminds me of the Mac Vs. PC commercials where I hear a lot of Mac users tell me they like the PC guy better than the smug Mac guy. It's very hard for some people to want to identify with the "cool guy" because some people don't identify with someone who is so obviously meant to be cool. Especially now that there's a whole geek-chique culture and the idea that it's "uncool to act cool." In the Dove ad, Hannah sounds like a person who is lost in trying to be cool. As Kate mentioned, she and people in general are realistically more mature and won't be able to identify. The people who would identify with Hannah or the "Mac guy" are those who are lost or trying hard to live some kind of mindless cool party-life.
Another example are beer commercials where the majority of them feature some insane party where all the girls are supermodels in bikinis and the guys look like they're on ecstasy. No one who appreciates beer for the taste and not just a means of getting completely plastered will identify with it.

Unfortunately, there's a huge demographic of males and females who do identify with that lifestyle or at the very least want to incorporate it somehow.
I identify with this girl...

Kate

KATE

Replying to alishahnovin:
You're totally right Leash. I hadn't given much thought to the sister character, other than her extreme uptight attitude, but the reality is she represents aspects of a life that many women (maybe a majority?) are working towards, and Dove has made a cartoon out of her. Now I know I've had nights (and morning afters) like Hannah...but I'd also like to get married and settle down one day like her sister. Am I not making my own decisions and living for myself if I pursue that? Sigh...I wish someone would give Dove a fresh perspective.
REPLIES: alishahnovin

SEE ALL 6 COMMENTS...


USERNAME:
PASSWORD:
REMEMBER ME
Forget your password?
Don't have an account? Sign Up, it's free!
Most Discussed Articles Top Articles Top Writers